Monday, November 20News That Matters

5 Myths WWE Fans Should Stop Believing



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WWE fans spend a lot of time trying to turn their beliefs into truths.

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

Take, for example, this ambitious petition&nbsp;of a fan who believes so vehemently that John Cena &quot;can’t wrestle&quot; that fans should boycott WWE because of it. This is one of many instances of a passionate WWE fan taking a myth, in this case the idea that Cena can’t wrestle, and forcing that myth on others in hopes that someone will agree with it. If we look at examples such as these from an optimistic viewpoint, they are a strong sign that WWE has a loyal fan base that wants the best from the product.

But realistically? Many WWE fans believe something so deeply that they fail to consider any evidence that might contradict their belief, no matter how concrete that evidence may be. Today, we’re going to put some of those myths to bed and show WWE fans that just because a vocal minority remains intensely devoted to their beliefs, that doesn’t necessarily make them true.

Here are five current myths WWE fans should stop believing.

Vince McMahon Wants SmackDown To Fail

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

A simple look at this Wrestling Forum thread&nbsp;shows that there are fans who legitimately believe Vince McMahon hates&nbsp;SmackDown&nbsp;and wants it to fail.

The notion that WWE’s head honcho would willingly and purposely position one of his brands to fail is absolutely preposterous, given that WWE’s TV contracts are the company’s single biggest source of revenue and expire in 2019. In fact, the Wrestling Observer’s Dave Meltzer (h/t Fox Sports)&nbsp;shed some light on this last year, writing:

For whatever reason, some people want to convince themselves that Vince McMahon is in charge of Raw but not Smackdown, as if the idea that everything bad is Vince’s fault but because they like Smackdown, it must be HHH or Ryan Ward and Vince has nothing to do with it. Vince is hands on and in 100% control of both shows.

McMahon has the final say-so on both&nbsp;Raw&nbsp;and&nbsp;SmackDown, and it was obvious for nearly a year after the 2016 brand split that he didn’t prefer&nbsp;Raw&nbsp;over&nbsp;SmackDown.&nbsp;From last summer to WrestleMania 33,&nbsp;SmackDown&nbsp;was clearly the better show as McMahon ensured that its move to a live Tuesday format and its perfectly balanced roster would result in a successful brand, something that’s evidenced by the show’s 12% ratings increase over the course of the last year.

It’s quite apparent that McMahon still wants the blue brand to thrive given the simple fact that he just returned to the show a couple of weeks ago. McMahon’s return resulted in the show’s best viewership since April, demonstrating that McMahon is willing to literally do the work himself in order to help&nbsp;SmackDown&nbsp;thrive, even being the centerpiece of&nbsp;SmackDown’s&nbsp;biggest and most publicized feud in order to do so.

John Cena And Triple &quot;Bury&quot; Anyone Who Threatens Their Position

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

Let’s just cut to the chase: John Cena and Triple H do not &quot;bury&quot; talent.

Triple H lost to Roman Reigns at WrestleMania 32, a record-shattering pay-per-view&nbsp;that set WWE’s all-time live gate and attendance record, meaning that he put over the new face of WWE at the company’s biggest PPV in history. A year later at WrestleMania 33, Triple H did the honors for Seth Rollins at the most-watched WrestleMania in history, with nearly two million households viewing the event on the WWE Network alone.

Now, how about John Cena? Just since 2016, he’s lost clean to Dean Ambrose, AJ Styles, Shinsuke Nakamura and Roman Reigns. His losses to Ambrose and Nakamura actually happened on TV, and his bout against Nakamura provided a boost to the blue brand’s ratings&nbsp;even though there was virtually no build to it. His feud with Styles was arguably the best of 2016 and helped establish Styles as a star in the eyes of the masses.

If Triple H and Cena have proved anything in recent years, it’s that they are not interested in destroying the pushes of up-and-coming talent in order to stroke their own egos. Meltzer recently reported that Cena has a lot of input on the booking of his character, so rest assured that if he wanted to throw a hissy-fit and refuse to put someone over, that’s likely exactly what he would do. But in realizing that putting over rising stars is ultimately for the betterment of the company, Cena and Triple H have done just that on multiple occasions over the years.

Yet, the jokes about Triple H’s &quot;shovel&quot; or Cena’s need to &quot;bury&quot; young talent are still inexplicably common.

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WWE fans spend a lot of time trying to turn their beliefs into truths.

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

Take, for example, this ambitious petition of a fan who believes so vehemently that John Cena “can’t wrestle” that fans should boycott WWE because of it. This is one of many instances of a passionate WWE fan taking a myth, in this case the idea that Cena can’t wrestle, and forcing that myth on others in hopes that someone will agree with it. If we look at examples such as these from an optimistic viewpoint, they are a strong sign that WWE has a loyal fan base that wants the best from the product.

But realistically? Many WWE fans believe something so deeply that they fail to consider any evidence that might contradict their belief, no matter how concrete that evidence may be. Today, we’re going to put some of those myths to bed and show WWE fans that just because a vocal minority remains intensely devoted to their beliefs, that doesn’t necessarily make them true.

Here are five current myths WWE fans should stop believing.

Vince McMahon Wants SmackDown To Fail

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

A simple look at this Wrestling Forum thread shows that there are fans who legitimately believe Vince McMahon hates SmackDown and wants it to fail.

The notion that WWE’s head honcho would willingly and purposely position one of his brands to fail is absolutely preposterous, given that WWE’s TV contracts are the company’s single biggest source of revenue and expire in 2019. In fact, the Wrestling Observer’s Dave Meltzer (h/t Fox Sports) shed some light on this last year, writing:

For whatever reason, some people want to convince themselves that Vince McMahon is in charge of Raw but not Smackdown, as if the idea that everything bad is Vince’s fault but because they like Smackdown, it must be HHH or Ryan Ward and Vince has nothing to do with it. Vince is hands on and in 100% control of both shows.

McMahon has the final say-so on both Raw and SmackDown, and it was obvious for nearly a year after the 2016 brand split that he didn’t prefer Raw over SmackDown. From last summer to WrestleMania 33, SmackDown was clearly the better show as McMahon ensured that its move to a live Tuesday format and its perfectly balanced roster would result in a successful brand, something that’s evidenced by the show’s 12% ratings increase over the course of the last year.

It’s quite apparent that McMahon still wants the blue brand to thrive given the simple fact that he just returned to the show a couple of weeks ago. McMahon’s return resulted in the show’s best viewership since April, demonstrating that McMahon is willing to literally do the work himself in order to help SmackDown thrive, even being the centerpiece of SmackDown’s biggest and most publicized feud in order to do so.

John Cena And Triple “Bury” Anyone Who Threatens Their Position

Credit: WWE.com

Credit: WWE.com

Let’s just cut to the chase: John Cena and Triple H do not “bury” talent.

Triple H lost to Roman Reigns at WrestleMania 32, a record-shattering pay-per-view that set WWE’s all-time live gate and attendance record, meaning that he put over the new face of WWE at the company’s biggest PPV in history. A year later at WrestleMania 33, Triple H did the honors for Seth Rollins at the most-watched WrestleMania in history, with nearly two million households viewing the event on the WWE Network alone.

Now, how about John Cena? Just since 2016, he’s lost clean to Dean Ambrose, AJ Styles, Shinsuke Nakamura and Roman Reigns. His losses to Ambrose and Nakamura actually happened on TV, and his bout against Nakamura provided a boost to the blue brand’s ratings even though there was virtually no build to it. His feud with Styles was arguably the best of 2016 and helped establish Styles as a star in the eyes of the masses.

If Triple H and Cena have proved anything in recent years, it’s that they are not interested in destroying the pushes of up-and-coming talent in order to stroke their own egos. Meltzer recently reported that Cena has a lot of input on the booking of his character, so rest assured that if he wanted to throw a hissy-fit and refuse to put someone over, that’s likely exactly what he would do. But in realizing that putting over rising stars is ultimately for the betterment of the company, Cena and Triple H have done just that on multiple occasions over the years.

Yet, the jokes about Triple H’s “shovel” or Cena’s need to “bury” young talent are still inexplicably common.

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